Curti To Take Wraps Off New Light Turbine Helicopter

Italy’s Curti Aerospace will officially make the commercial launch of its two-seat turbine Zefhir helicopter later this week at the Aero Friedrichshafen show in Germany. Zefhir was formerly known as the “Disrupt” project that was funded by a European Commission initiative to benefit small and medium enterprises and made its public design debut in 2016.

The Zefhir helicopter was designed to serve both the recreational and commercial markets as a trainer. It was developed as a partnership between Curti and Czech engine maker PBS Velká Bíteš (PBSVB) and Junkers Profly, which developed the whole-aircraft ballistic parachute recovery system. According to Curti, the aircraft features crashworthy seats.

Its custom-designed maximum continuous 241-shp engine is derated to 141 shp. Curti said it developed the helicopter to meet the market need for a better designed light helicopter with a more powerful engine.

For more than 40 years, Curti has made sub assemblies and components for aerospace and defense companies such as Leonardo. Company products include design and manufacture of equipment for the production of parts and assemblies for helicopters, trainer aircraft, and vehicles for transporting troops and heavy artillery.

Click here for more information on A&R Aviation’s Helicopter Maintenance Services.

Bye Aerospace Announces First Flight of Sun Flyer 2

Bye Aerospace announced the prototype Sun Flyer 2 aircraft had its first flight April 10.

The prototype aircraft flight test program, which began in late March, is being conducted at Centennial Airport (KAPA), south of Denver, Colorado, and are now progressing to increased speed, altitude and endurance capabilities.

George Bye, Founder and CEO of Bye Aerospace, thanked and congratulated the Bye Aerospace team for the successful transition to the next test phase. “We are excited about the future and the potential the Sun Flyer family of aircraft has to revolutionize general aviation, providing improved affordability and accessibility,” Bye said. “Lower operating costs are key to solving the student pilot drop-out rate, which is curtailing the successful attainment of badly needed airline pilots. The Sun Flyer 2’s $3 hourly operating costs are 10 times lower than traditional piston-engine flight trainers, with no carbon emissions and significantly reduced noise.”

EP Systems provided the energy storage system for the Sun Flyer 2 prototype aircraft being flight tested, including battery modules (packs), battery management unit and power distribution unit. The battery cells are LG Chem “MJ1” lithium-ion battery cells with a 260 Wh/kg energy density. Bye Aerospace will soon announce who its electric motor partner will be for the family of FAA-certified Sun Flyer aircraft.

Charlie Johnson, Bye Aerospace President, said he was extremely pleased to launch the test flight phase for the Sun Flyer 2 program. “We had a fantastic first flight,” he said.

The Sun Flyer family of aircraft, including the Sun Flyer 2 and the 4-seat “Sun Flyer 4,” will be the first FAA-certified, U.S.-sponsored, practical, all-electric airplanes to serve the flight training and general aviation markets.

Press Release – Bye Aerospace
www.byeaerospace.com

 

MCCORMACK FACES AVIATION DOGFIGHT

Australia’s general aviation ­industry will campaign against Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack in his electorate, potentially even standing a candidate against him, if he fails to endorse regulatory reform.The Aircraft Owners and ­Pilots Association yesterday told The Australian it would set up a campaign office in Wagga Wagga, in Mr McCormack’s Riverina electorate, and consider running a candidate, if he failed to commit to changes to the Civil Aviation Act.

“The general aviation industry is in a perilous situation,” AOPA chief executive Ben Morgan said. “For the minister to come out and say he needs time (to consider reform) … is almost laughable. The Nationals have had carriage of the transport portfolio for many years.

“If our minister is not going to listen, I wonder if the people of Wagga would be prepared to have a conversation. We may even need to consider putting candidates forward (in Riverina and other electorates) … to see that these issues are resolved.”

AOPA, which represents thousands of pilots and business owners in general aviation across the country, is backing changes to the act negotiated by former civil aviation safety chief Dick Smith. Mr Smith in February revealed he had found consensus on amendments that then-deputy prime minister Barnaby Joyce and Labor’s ­Anthony Albanese both indicated they could support.

These would require the Civil Aviation Safety Authority to ­operate in a manner that recognised the need for “an efficient and sustainable Australian aviation industry”, as well as the “highest level of safety in air navigation”. Many in general aviation, which includes charter, air emergency, pilot training and agricultural operations, believe the act’s current requirement on CASA to “regard safety as the most important consideration” has led to a tangle of costly, needless regulation.

Mr McCormack, who succeeded Mr Joyce on February 26, this week declined to endorse the Smith changes.

But yesterday Mr McCormack said he was happy to meet AOPA to discuss its concerns and reform ideas. “The deputy PM is certainly open to reform, after due consideration is given to any proposals put forward,” his spokesman said. “Reform such as this takes time to ensure everyone’s views are considered and to ensure there are no unintended consequences.”

CASA argues it already considers the financial impact of its regulations, but the issue is gaining traction nationally, with a Senate inquiry taking evidence about the impact of regulation on regional aviation costs.

Inquiry member XNT senator Rex Patrick called for urgent action to tackle the “cost of CASA” and produced CASA data showing revenue from its regulatory service fees rose from $2.9m in 2000 to $13.9m in 2017.

CASA’s staff ballooned from 621 in 2007 to 830 in 2017, while its operating budget rose from $129m to $180m over the same period. “Something has to change,’’ Senator Patrick said.

Mr Morgan said the decline in general aviation was undeniable, with 25 per cent of the fleet of 2993 aircraft not in use.

The Australian, 12th April 2018

A&R Aviation are great supporters of general aviation legislation reform in Australia.
We constantly see first hand what this over-regulation and cost burdening is doing to the industry that we know and love.
The industry is already facing a critical shortage of Engineers & Pilots, we urge the federal government to hear AOPA and actually start to implement change!